Tagged: Issue 1 Vol 4

Contexts

Literature – it’s a touchy subject whenever brought up, or wherever – be it in the Law faculty canteen or at the family dinner table. Throughout the ages that it has existed in the public realm, it has always had its share of critics, forever ready to dismiss it as a paltry area of study for those of a whimsical bent of mind. It has also always had loyalists, those who take pleasure in dissecting the yellowing pages of a text with a variety of theoretical scalpels. Literophile is an effort by the loyalists, returning after a long hiatus.

It was almost half a decade ago, in August of 2005, when two young women decided to chase a daydream, leading to the inception of this beloved journal. Needless to say Amrita Singh and Sumi Saikia, the leading ladies behind this venture, had their fair share of running from pillar to post to make this dream come true. And even with their efforts, the journal wouldn’t have been made possible without the constant support of a dedicated team of students and faculty members from various colleges.

This was the first time in Delhi University that a journal specific to the interests of English Literature enthusiasts came into being. And to add to that, it was one of the few independent initiatives to be run by DU students. It was the first time that innovative literary discourse and debate was given a forum outside the classroom. Literophile gave literature students a medium to express their opinions, or to explore them through well-researched articles. With a new literary theme in each issue, a new line of thought was encouraged to which students always responded positively.

Over the next couple of years, Literophile grew and its presence spread across campuses. Students began to talk about it, teachers recommended it and the team took to promoting it through active distribution, word-of-mouth and print; the journal was also extended beyond DU into the JNU campus. Things were going well for the journal.

Being a student-run publication, funds were usually hard to come by. In spite of this, to keep Literophile affordable, the original team sold the journal at a loss. Unfortunately, due to lack of funds, the journal came to a standstill after the November 2007 issue.

Efforts to revive it had proved futile until a ray of hope appeared in the form of a bright team of students who approached me last year with the intent of reviving this venture. And today, I write to congratulate them for taking the initiative to carry forward this legacy. Having been a part of this journal once, I, amongst others, know how hard it is, to take time out from our schedules and take this forward. I feel great joy and pride for the current team and hope that their hard-work bears fruit.

Now without more ado, I urge you to sit back as this wonderful labour of love takes you on a fantastic flight, replete with literary gems which may well be priceless.

Best Wishes,
Moosa Khan
(Editor; Issue 1; Vol 3)